Jehovah

/Tag:Jehovah

The New World Translation translates “kyrios” as “Jehovah”

This article is listed in the Answers category Question 19 of Stumper Questions for Jehovah's Witnesses The NWT translates the Greek word "kyrios" as "Jehovah" more than 25 times in the New Testament (Mt 3:3, Lk 2:9, Jn 1:23, Acts 21:14, Rom 12:19, Col 1:10, 1Thess 5:2, 1Pet 1:25, Rev 4:8, etc.). Why is the [...]

August 4th, 2015|Answers|1 Comment

When did the name “Jehovah” come into existence?

QUESTION: A friend of mine has been talking to me about his faith and church, Jehovah’s Witnesses. I am trying to understand some of the things he is saying. In my research I came across a YouTube video of yours and you seem to have a lot of knowledge. I asked him this question but have not received an answer.

Perhaps you can tell me. When did the name Jehovah come into existence?

 

September 7th, 2013|Mailbag|2 Comments

If love is not jealous, and God is love, why is God jealous?

QUESTION: I have a question that you can probably help out with. The Bible says that God is love. It also says that love is never jealous. If both those statements are true, then God can never be jealous. The problem is, of course, that the Bible clearly indicates that Jehovah is a jealous God. How are these three seemingly contradictory concepts to be reconciled with one another?

April 23rd, 2013|Mailbag|0 Comments

Jehovah

The name of God, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and consequently the God of Israel, was represented in written form by the four Hebrew consonants YHWH. Probably the first appearance in writing of the so-called Tetragrammaton took place when God carved out the two stone tablets upon which he wrote the Ten Commandments for the Israelites. There, chiseled in stone by the very finger of God, the name of God appeared eight times.

Over the course of 15 centuries as the Bible was compiled by various writers, ultimately the name of God appeared in the vellum and papyrus scrolls in nearly 7,000 places – more than any other proper name. Originally the name of God was freely spoken by the Jews and used in everyday language. Hebrews often named their offspring names that incorporated some form of the divine name. For example, the common name, John, is a shortened form of the Hebrew name, Jehohanan, which means “Jehovah has been gracious.”

Places were also named names that honored God’s name. For example, when God prevented Abraham from offering Isaac upon a makeshift altar and instead provided a ram as a substitute, a grateful Abraham named the mountain Jehovah-Jireh, which means “Jehovah will provide.” Incidentally, Jewish tradition has it that the place Abraham named Jehovah-Jireh was the site where Solomon’s temple was built almost 1,000 years later, and which became known as the place where Jehovah caused his name to reside.

October 17th, 2011|Page One|1 Comment